For a Kinder, Gentler Society
Envy of the World:
An Illustrated History of the US Economy and Big Business
  • Timothy J. Botti
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Envy of the World: . An Illustrated History of the  US Economy and Big Business
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The first comprehensive historical study of the American economy and Big Business, Envy provides a thorough survey of American progress through the lens of industry, with a kaleidoscope of 100s of illustrations, graphs and charts.

About the Author

Timothy J. Botti holds a PhD in the history of American Foreign Policy and is a former Lecturer/Teaching Assistant at Ohio State University.

As an independent historian without allegiance to any political philosophy or party, he is able in his research and writing to go where the evidence leads. Thorough study combined with inductive, rather than deductive, reasoning is his basic approach.

Botti's expertise is in the history of world empires, American military and strategic studies, ancient Roman history, and the subject of his current work, the U.S. economy and Big Business. He takes the approach of applying broad knowledge to broad subjects, synthesizing information from across many areas.

In 2005, Dr. Botti created a firm called CLP Research to provide value-added research products, ranging from reports on businesses and industries to political genealogies, over the Internet.

His previous books include Ace in the Hole: Why the United States Did Not Use Nuclear Weapons in the Cold War (Greenwood Press 1996), and The Long Wait: The Forging of the Anglo-American Nuclear Alliance, 1945-1958 (Greenwood 1987).

About the Book
Envy of the World is a history of the rise and development of the American economy and Big Business over four centuries and how the individual and collective actions of Americans, native born and foreign, came to create the $11.5 trillion economy...
Envy of the World is a history of the rise and development of the American economy and Big Business over four centuries and how the individual and collective actions of Americans, native born and foreign, came to create the $11.5 trillion economy of today.

Although the building American juggernaut was blessed above other nations with all manner of natural resources, the inventiveness and drive of the American people made the most of what Providence had bestowed. Steadily, then more swiftly, the foundation was laid for success. More intimate knowledge of economic reality and theory in the 20th century led ultimately to the world's greatest economy of today.

The book provides periodic quantitative summation of gross domestic product, population, employment, company results, and other statistics, particularly in later chapters. Because the author's philosophy is that a picture AND a thousand words are better than either one alone, he has made extensive use of original charts and graphs, illustrations, industry genealogies, and maps.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrations Part 1. Laying the Foundation for Success: 1607-1860 Chapter I. An Irreconcilable Conflict of Interest, 1607-1762

List of Illustrations

Part 1. Laying the Foundation for Success: 1607-1860
Chapter I. An Irreconcilable Conflict of Interest, 1607-1762
Cost and Value of Land
Bounty of a New Continent
Population and Labor
Channeling Colonial Ambition
Expansion of Agriculture and Enterprise
Overseas Trade
Manufacturing and Industry
Chapter II. The Struggle for Control: 1763-1783
Turning the Financial Screws
Western Land Compensation
Economic Tit for Tat
First US War Economy
Chapter III. Independence with Material Advantage: 1783-1815
A Fitful Start
Hamilton's Economic System
Developing the Internal Market
Expanding the Financial System
Innovation, Industry, and Labor
Economic Causes and Consequences of the War of 1812
Chapter IV. Manifest Economic Progress: 1816-1860
Developing a Modern Financial System
Tapping a Continent's Natural Resources
Overseas Trade Advances
Internal Improvements
Innovation Fuels Economic Expansion
Labor and Population

Part 2. Big Business and Government Vie for Supremacy: 1861-1945
Chapter V. Rise of Big Business: 1861-1890
Civil War Economic Stimulus
Struggles of Farmers and Working Men
Distracted, Reluctant Government
Reconsidering Land Use Policy
Expansion but Relative Decline of Agriculture
Myth and Reality of the Self-Made Men
Invention of New Products and Services Creates New Industries
Embattled Industrial Labor
Chapter VI. Capitalism within a Progressive Environment: 1890-1913
Developing a Regulatory Environment
Rising Might of Industry and Finance
The Second Transportation Revolution
Consumer Spending Gravitates toward Brand Names
Roots of the Entertainment Industry
Hard Climb of the Labor Movement Continues
Agriculture's Dependence on Overseas Trade
Chapter VII. A Roaring but Inflated Good Time: 1914-1929
First World War and the Economy
Reaction against Progressivism
Mass Communications and Entertainment
Big Industry Gets Bigger
Innovation of Consumer Spending Funded with Debt
Chapter VIII. Government and War Rescue the Economy: 1929-1945
Initial Government Responses to Calamity
Partial Industrial Recovery
The Rise of Organized Labor and More Radical Proposals
Impact of Second World War Spending

Part 3. Broadening Out of Economic Possibilities: 1946-1989
Chapter IX. A Relatively Golden Era of Economic Growth: 1946-1960
Postwar Adjustment and Government Policy
First Postwar Economic Boom
Impact of the Korean War
Eisenhower Economics and Big Business
Innovation in Financial Services, Insurance, and Pharmaceuticals
The Conglomerate Concept
Consumer Purchases Drive the Economy
A Time of Transition in Entertainment, Leisure, and the Arts
New Technology in Business Machines
Balance Between Wage-Earners and Wealthy

Chapter X. Proliferating the Material American Dream: 1961-1972
Kennedy Economics and the Growth of US Financial Assets
The Great Society and Consequences for the Economy
The Resurgence of American Financial Institutions
Economics as an Extension of Politics
High Tide for US Manufacturing
The Wide World of Entertainment
Cornucopia of Consumer Goods
On the Verge of a High-Tech Revolution
Mainstream for Big Labor; Morning Again for Wealth
Chapter XI. Economic Complexities Beyond the Control of Government: 1973-1980
Oil Embargo and Its Impact
Carter Economics Frustrates the Country
Deregulation and Free Trade
Diversification and Specialization in Difficult Times
Man Versus Machine
Wealth and Worry
Chapter XII. Pendulum Swing Back Toward a Freer Economy: 1981-1989
Reagan Deregulation Policy and Impact
Developments in Transportation and Heavy Industry
Tax Cuts Spur the Financial Industry
Boom Times for Aerospace- Defense and Telecommunications
Health Care as a National Asset — and a Household Burden
Farming Becomes Agri-Business
King Consumer Spends Again
The New Technology Economy
The Waxing Value of Intangible Assets
A Decade of Winners and Losers

Part 4. Old Economy Versus New Economy 1990-2004
Chapter XIII. Roller Coaster Ride for Energy and Transportation
Cheap Oil Fuels the Economy
Crossed Wires in Electricity
Government Interferes with and Assists Transportation
Chapter XIV. Retrenchment of US Heavy Industry
Consolidating the Military Industrial Complex
Embattled Steel Reorganizes to Fight Imports and Alternatives
A Boom in Construction
Chapter XV. Pressing a Global Advantage
Two Steps Forward, One Step Back Toward Free Trade
Battles Royal over Agriculture and Forestry
Chapter XVI. As Goes Consumer Spending So Goes the Economy
Competition Narrows and Intensifies in Consumer Durables
The Era of Mega Retailers
Basic Staples of the Consumer Economy Thrive
Chapter XVII. The New Economy Reaches Critical Mass
The Internet Phenomenon
Communications Explosion and Implosion
The Computer Industry Matures
Other High Technology Developments
Chapter XVIII. Creative Content Creates Big Profits
Cable Revolutionizes the TV Industry
Panorama of Video Possibilities
Elusive Profits for Music and Publishing
Chapter Chapter XIX. Blending the Old Economy with the New
Clinton Economics and the Health Care Maelstrom
Drug Companies Prosper in the Global Market
Chapter XX. A Republic Richer than Croesus
Freeing the Golden Goose of Financial Services
An Investor's Market
Bringing More Variety to Insurance
Chapter XXI. Competition for Wealth and Income
Big Buildup of Wealth—and Debt
Labor as a Global Commodity
Government's Shifting Policies
Chapter XXII. Legacy of the Past Inspires a Challenge for the Future
Index of Names
Index of Companies, Products, and Services


More Information
Author's Foreword

At time of this writing in 2005, following a Presidential election campaign characterized by harsh criticism of special moneyed interests and foreign outsourcing of labor, many Americans have taken a dim view of Big Business and the federal government's management of the economy. This book does not shrink from pointing out episodes of corporate greed and malfeasance as well as...

Author's Foreword

At time of this writing in 2005, following a Presidential election campaign characterized by harsh criticism of special moneyed interests and foreign outsourcing of labor, many Americans have taken a dim view of Big Business and the federal government's management of the economy. This book does not shrink from pointing out episodes of corporate greed and malfeasance as well as mistakes by Washington both in the recent and distant past. However, the impression is epidemic among the populace that the advances and conveniences of a modern society are the God-given right of Americans. In point of fact, the cornucopia of excellence that exists in food and household products, clothing and consumer durables, housing and motor vehicle transportation, health care and high tech industry, and other goods and services, would not be available to the majority of citizens but for the ambition, effort, and, yes, self-interest of entrepreneurs who founded, grew, and consolidated private enterprise companies. Further, the sometimes contradictory efforts by government officials to balance the interests of corporations, societal groups, and individuals have created by-and-large a most beneficial atmosphere for economic endeavor. Praise of business and governmental leaders in no way diminishes the importance of the exertions, intellectual as well as physical, of working men and women.

Any American who travels abroad for any length of time will recognize that by comparison with the progress and wherewithal of other countries, the United States is most fortunate in its material blessings and accomplishments. Given the number of people from all points of the compass desiring to come to these shores, and conversely the rising tide of hostility toward American economic and geo-strategic hegemony in diverse regions of the world, the majority of foreigners apparently think so too.

However, this book is not about world opinion of the United States. Rather, it is a history of the rise and development of the American economy and Big Business over four centuries and how the individual and collective actions of Americans, native born and foreign, came to create the $11.7 trillion economy of today. Inseparable from the discussion is periodic quantitative summation of gross domestic product, population, employment, company results, and other statistics. Particularly in later chapters, the reader will notice a greater emphasis on numbers. Hopefully, figures will not compromise readability. Because my philosophy continues to be that a picture and a thousand words are better than just the thousand words, I have made extensive use of graphs, illustrations, industry genealogies, and maps. Updated graphs using current year data will be available on the website Masnapshot.com beginning in autumn 2006. Other analyses of company and industry merger and acquisition activity will also be included on the site.


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Pages 736
Year: 2006
LC Classification: HC103.B77
Dewey code: 330.973--dc22
BISAC: BUS022000
BISAC: HIS036000
BISAC: BUS077000
Soft Cover
ISBN: 978-0-87586-431-0
Price: USD 36.00
Hard Cover
ISBN: 978-0-87586-432-7
Price: USD 48.00
eBook
ISBN: 978-0-87586-433-4
Price: USD 36.00
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