For a Kinder, Gentler Society
The World’s Richest Neighborhood
How Pittsburgh’s East Enders Forged American Industry
  • Quentin R. Skrabec Jr.
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The World’s Richest Neighborhood. How Pittsburgh’s East Enders Forged American Industry
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In 1900, Pittsburgh's East End neighborhood was the world's richest. It represented the opulence, power, and greed of 19th-century capitalism. And for many it was statement of hope and motivation. In a short walk, one might run into Andrew Carnegie, Henry Clay Frick, George Westinghouse, H. J. Heinz, a member of the Mellon family or of the United States Congress. This book traces the lives of this influential coterie and their impact on American industry, culture and history. 


About the Author

Working from a home base in the industrial heartland of northern Ohio and Western Pennsylvania, for twenty years Quentin R. Skrabec Jr. has been researching the history of America’s industrialization and the key figures who moved the process forward, resulting in a series of biographies of American industrialists published by Algora. He has published over fifty articles on history, industrial history and business, and five books on the late 1800s and American business.

Prof. Skrabec has been an Associate Professor of Business at the University of Findlay, OH, since 1998. He has taught as an adjunct professor at the University of Toledo, the University of Akron, University of Pittsburgh, and Robert Morris University.

A Pittsburgher himself, from this section of the city, Quentin Skrabec grew up in its rich heritage. Having written biographies of some of its most successful residents -- Heinz, Westinghouse, McGuffey, Carnegie, and Frick, in this book Prof. Skrabec develops many stories of the famous capitalists who lived in Pittsburgh's East End.

 

About the Book
The residents of Pittsburgh's East End controlled as much a 40% of America's assets at the turn of the last century. Mail was delivered seven times a day to keep America's greatest capitalists in touch with their factories, banks, and markets. The...
The residents of Pittsburgh's East End controlled as much a 40% of America's assets at the turn of the last century. Mail was delivered seven times a day to keep America's greatest capitalists in touch with their factories, banks, and markets. The neighborhood had its own private station of the Pennsylvania Railroad with a daily non-stop express to New York's financial district. Many of the world's most powerful men — princes, artists, politicians, scientists, and American Presidents such as William McKinley, Teddy Roosevelt, William Taft, Calvin Coolidge, and Herbert Hoover, came to visit the hard-working and high-flying captains of industry. Two major corporations, Standard Oil and ALCOA Aluminum were formed in East End homes. It was the first neighborhood to adopt the telephone with direct lines from the homes to the biggest banks in Pittsburgh, which at the time was America's fifth largest city.

The story of this neighborhood is a story of America at its greatest point of wealth and includes rags-to-riches stories, political corruption, scandals, and greed. The history of this unique piece of American geography makes for enjoyable reading that will satisfy a large cross section of readers.
More . . .
The story of Pittsburgh’s East End is the story of America’s industrial heritage, the Gilded Age, and Victorian living. It is local, regional, national, and international history all in one. It is a history of American industrialization. It contrasts the best and the worst of Victorian capitalism. It was at the center of major historical events such as the Johnstown Flood, the Homestead Strike, the Great Railroad Strike of 1877, the use of AC electric current for home lighting, and the...
The story of Pittsburgh’s East End is the story of America’s industrial heritage, the Gilded Age, and Victorian living. It is local, regional, national, and international history all in one. It is a history of American industrialization. It contrasts the best and the worst of Victorian capitalism. It was at the center of major historical events such as the Johnstown Flood, the Homestead Strike, the Great Railroad Strike of 1877, the use of AC electric current for home lighting, and the formation of America’s first billion-dollar corporation. The neighborhood played a major role in America’s political systems and in the careers of many of America’s presidents such as Lincoln, McKinley, Taft, Harding, and Roosevelt. It is a truly cross-section of our nation’s history.
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Categories

Pages 300
Year: 2010
BISAC: HIS036000 HISTORY / United States / General
BISAC: HIS036010 HISTORY / United States / State & Local
Soft Cover
ISBN: 978-0-87586-795-3
Price: USD 23.95
Hard Cover
ISBN: 978-0-87586-796-0
Price: USD 33.95
eBook
ISBN: 978-0-87586-797-7
Price: USD 23.95
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