For a Kinder, Gentler Society
The Fall of an American Rome
Deindustrialization of the American Dream
  • Quentin R. Skrabec, Jr.
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The Fall of an American Rome. Deindustrialization of the American Dream
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This is the story of the de-industrialization of America, written by a Business professor with a background in steel company management who grew up in the city of Pittsburgh and loved its manufacturing environment.

 

The book is based on the facts and aims to avoid any partisan political viewpoint - which is not as difficult as it may seem, since both U.S. political parties support free trade economics.

The story does not single out the union, the workers, management, politicians, or American voters and consumers, since there is plenty of blame to share. Even the economic policy of the country since 1945, which clearly must carry a large portion of the blame, was accepted for all the right reasons. 


About the Author

Dr. Skrabec moved from a successful career in industrial management (at LSE/LTV Steel, Jessop Steel and National Steel) to serving as an Associate Professor of Business at the University of Findlay, OH, since 1998.

Skrabec has published over fifty articles on history, industrial history and business, and five books on business, industry and management. For twenty years Prof. Quentin Skrabec has been researching the history of America’s industrialization and the key figures who moved the process forward. Dr. Skrabec has published a series of biographies at Algora, followed by a broader study of the policies that have dealt such a blow to American industry in general. 

Skrabec is a native Pittsburgher with a strong background in the local stories and heroes.

About the Book
The author considers US industrial policies that have shaped today’s economic landscape and finds that, however well-intended, our polices have been misguided. Free trade was to promote world peace and democracy. No one foresaw the ancillary...
The author considers US industrial policies that have shaped today’s economic landscape and finds that, however well-intended, our polices have been misguided. Free trade was to promote world peace and democracy. No one foresaw the ancillary effects of the 1970s on the United States. Yet this approach has brought destruction upon our cities, workers, managers, and country.

Dr. Skrabec writes - not to condemn or demonize any party to this debacle - but out of a love for American manufacturing and those once-robust cities such as Detroit, Toledo, Pittsburgh, Akron, and so many others, that drove the American economy to the top.


Introduction
In the 1980s I would experience firsthand one of the nation’s largest steel mergers, and a few years later one of its largest bankruptcies. As the manufacturing base collapsed in America, I left industry to obtain a PhD in manufacturing. Initially, I hoped to help drive a manufacturing revolution with such programs as Lean Manufacturing, Six...
In the 1980s I would experience firsthand one of the nation’s largest steel mergers, and a few years later one of its largest bankruptcies. As the manufacturing base collapsed in America, I left industry to obtain a PhD in manufacturing. Initially, I hoped to help drive a manufacturing revolution with such programs as Lean Manufacturing, Six Sigma, and ISO 9000. This type of program, while extremely helpful to industry, was unable to overcome the political and economic infrastructure in America today. We have a policy of de-industrialization, although no one refers to it that way. Instead we are told of a post-industrial strategy where information will be the source of jobs. Still, I believed manufacturing could be saved...

Pages 216
Year: 2014
BISAC: BUS070050
BISAC: BUS000000
Soft Cover
ISBN: 978-1-62894-060-2
Price: USD 22.95
Hard Cover
ISBN: 978-1-62894-061-9
Price: USD 32.95
eBook
ISBN: 978-1-62894-062-6
Price: USD 22.95
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