For a Kinder, Gentler Society
The False Dialectic between Christians and Atheists
  • Tom Donovan
Reviews Table of Contents Introduction «Back
The False Dialectic between Christians and Atheists.
Sound Bite
Could it be that atheism and belief in God are both forms of avoidance behavior? It's easier to focus on belief than it is to take up a new practice of living. Perhaps both are ideological distractions that mystify the nature of reality and what knowledge is. What if we admit that we are neither believers nor atheists: Does that mean we're nothing?

About the Author

Dr. Donovan holds an MA in Philosophy from Michigan State University and a PhD in Philosophy from The University of California, Riverside. For his dissertation he focused on the works of Horkheimer and Adorno, Habermas and Lukács. Tom is chair of Philosophy at Mt. San Jacinto College, where he has been teaching philosophy and humanities for over 15 years.

Prof. Donovan is publishing a series of books with Algora that make philosophy accessible and useful for real readers.

About the Book
Could it be that atheism and belief in God are both forms of avoidance behavior?

It's easier to focus on belief than it is to take up a new practice of living. Perhaps both are ideological distractions that mystify the nature of reality and...

Could it be that atheism and belief in God are both forms of avoidance behavior?

It's easier to focus on belief than it is to take up a new practice of living. Perhaps both are ideological distractions that mystify the nature of reality and what knowledge is. What if we admit that we are neither believers nor atheists: Does that mean we're nothing?

Philosophy aims to help us understand the world without appealing to something beyond. It's considered to be rooted in the search for eternal truths, and when the truth is unclear, philosophy is expected to embrace modesty and have a willingness to say “I don't know.” Rejecting the false dialectic of God/atheism will help us recognize that the world is our construction and our responsibility so long as we are here.

Drawing on Georg Lukács and Max Horkheimer, the author argues that belief in God and atheism are both ideological distractions. They are both forms of immaturity that can only be transcended through action. The real good news is that we can do away with belief in the supernatural, but it will take more than non-belief; it will take philosophical action.

He takes us on a journey through our philosophical practices to purge ourselves of mystified notions. The journey is long, but at least the path is strewn with the charm of Socrates, Descartes, Marx, and Sartre.

In short, Prof. Donovan says, "Nothing exists but this world, our world... Nothing is beyond God and atheism. Why not become nothing? Make yourself and those who matter proud."


More Information
Rejecting a negative label, an anti-label, can create new possibilities. For example, someone might label you “anti-social” or “rude” because you don’t like parties and loud events and activities. But you are not anti-social; you are not rude. You are an introvert. When we let extroverts control the discourse, we miss the deeper beauty and sophistication that lives inside the introvert. Introverts don’t need the world to entertain them; introverts don’t need to be loud and don’t need to be...
Rejecting a negative label, an anti-label, can create new possibilities. For example, someone might label you “anti-social” or “rude” because you don’t like parties and loud events and activities. But you are not anti-social; you are not rude. You are an introvert. When we let extroverts control the discourse, we miss the deeper beauty and sophistication that lives inside the introvert. Introverts don’t need the world to entertain them; introverts don’t need to be loud and don’t need to be the center of attention. Introverts have a rich world within themselves. But if others are constantly labeling you as “anti-social” or “rude” because you are not a clown, it will distort the inner richness that only an introvert appreciates. It depends on context, but sometimes the answer is to control the term, or come up with a new term, and sometimes it is best to completely reject any term. Sometimes no label is correct.
Categories

Pages 176
Year: 2016
BISAC: REL004000 RELIGION / Atheism
BISAC: PHI035000 PHILOSOPHY / Essays
Soft Cover
ISBN: 978-1-62894-210-1
Price: USD 21.95
Hard Cover
ISBN: 978-1-62894-211-8
Price: USD 31.95
eBook
ISBN: 978-1-62894-212-5
Price: USD 31.95
Available from

Search the full text of this book
Related Books
• Dialectic of Enlightenment as Sport —   The Barbaric Urge within Sports, Religion, and Capitalism
• Mikhail Bakunin —   The Philosophical Basis of His Theory of Anarchism
• Reason and Doctrine —   Time for Christians to Rethink What They Believe
• Reason in Revolt, Vol. I —   Dialectical Philosophy and Modern Science
• First Principles —   A Return to Humanity's Shared Traditions