For a Kinder, Gentler Society
The Afghan Intel Crisis
Satellite State - War of Interests and the Blame Game
  • Musa Khan Jalalzai
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The Afghan Intel Crisis . Satellite State - War of Interests and the Blame Game
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The War on Terror has left Afghanistan without a viable centralized intelligence agency. Thousands of bloodstained and heartbreaking stories in newspapers, journals and books document the failures of the KHAD and NDS. The government and military are both crippled by "bad intel" due to lack of mutual trust and limited information sharing.

About the Author

Musa Khan Jalalzai is a journalist whose experience includes over 25 years extensive research in political analysis, Afghanistan, terrorism issues, and human trafficking. His articles have been published by The New Yorker, the New York Times, and Moscow Times (English-language daily). He has published several books studying sectarian and ethnic violence, policing, and terrorism in various parts of the world, as well as the increasing crime, corruption and instability in Pakistan, Afghanistan and the region.

During the First Gulf War (1991-1993) he was a research scholar at the Pakistan Institute of National Affairs where he completed two books on Persian Gulf politics. He was Executive Director of the Daily Outlook, Afghanistan (2005-2009), and is a permanent writer of articles for Pakistan's daily The Post. He has a regular column in the Daily Times (Lahore, Pakistan) and The New Nation (Bangladesh).

Mr. Jalalzai has published four books with Algora focusing on Pakistan, Afghanistan, and questions of security, law enforcement, and the global intelligence war.

About the Book
Despite America's commitment to a "War on Terror," Afghan intelligence agencies remain unprofessional and profoundly ill-equipped to fight the Taliban and ISIS, incapable of effectively warning of threats, blocking deadly attacks, or adhering to...
Despite America's commitment to a "War on Terror," Afghan intelligence agencies remain unprofessional and profoundly ill-equipped to fight the Taliban and ISIS, incapable of effectively warning of threats, blocking deadly attacks, or adhering to elementary standards of treatment for suspects and prisoners.

International journalist Musa Khan Jalalzai outlines the obstacles that stop them from developing professional, reliable systems so they can provide the government and military with actionable intel: tribal rivalries and lack of education, international interference, and no foundation of national identity to build on.

Thousands of innocent people are killed in secret prisons, in broad daylight, and during brutal "investigations." Torture, custodial death, and denial of due process continue to drive citizens into revolt. He shows how such illegal and repugnant tactics have alienated the citizens from the state and forced young people to take up arms against the government and its international partners.

The role of Pakistan is a particular focus, as well as relations with India and other neighbors. Broken agreements and a complete breakdown of trust, the author shows, threaten a complete failure of the Afghan state if this continues.



Reviews
May 15, 2017, Kabul. Sri Lanka Guardian, and The Nation (the UK\'s large Pakistani circulation newspaper), by Noor Dahri | More »
Categories

Pages 232
Year: 2017
BISAC: HIS027190 HISTORY / Military / Afghan War (2001-)*
BISAC: POL037000 POLITICAL SCIENCE / Terrorism
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ISBN: 978-1-62894-270-5
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