For a Kinder, Gentler Society
Footprints of the Welsh Indians
Settlers of North America before 1492
  • William L. Traxel
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Footprints of the Welsh Indians. Settlers of North America before 1492
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17th-19th c. American memoirs cite meetings with "White" Indians, and linguistic, archeological, and anthropological evidence from Alabama to the Dakotas suggest that Welshmen were among the first settlers of America.

About the Author

William L. Traxel has researched the literary, archeological, linguistic and anthropological evidence of pre-Columbian visits and settlements in North America for over 20 years. He graduated from Northwestern University, and Vanderbilt University, and has a doctorate degree from the University of Michigan. Mr. Traxel is a direct descendant of Squire Boone, the grandfather of the legendary frontiersman Daniel Boone.

About the Book

The legend of Prince Madoc and the Welsh Indians is a remarkable story of a brave, resourceful and intelligent people and the footprints they left in the New World - a story that can grip the beholder with...

The legend of Prince Madoc and the Welsh Indians is a remarkable story of a brave, resourceful and intelligent people and the footprints they left in the New World - a story that can grip the beholder with intrigue and emotion. Archaeological finds in the Southern states as well as in the Ohio Valley include the remains of highly engineered stone forts, metal implements and other artifacts impossible to explain in the context of the savage tribes encountered by the Europeans and Americans who eventually settled the region. Did the Welsh leave them?

In 12th century Wales, the terror and turmoil brought about by the contention for the throne caused an exodus of the frightened and disillusioned populace. The songs of medieval bards suggest that Prince Madoc, drawing on the seafaring knowledge of his Viking forebears, led some three expeditions westward, across the seas, to seek a new life in a land that could hardly be less hospitable than home. Legends of the Toltecs and Aztecs relate that ships full of tall blond men visited the Americas in this time period; needless to say, they were taken to be gods of the seas.

After visiting Mexico, Madoc is believed to have sailed to the north side of the Gulf, where he founded a colony in Mobile Bay in 1170, and another at the mouth of the Mississippi. Over time, both groups were forced by warring Indians to move on, with the first group traversing Alabama, Georgia and Tennessee. Wars with the Cherokee forced them out of Tennessee in about 1500, and in a great migration they found their way to the banks of the Upper Missouri River, where they became known as the Mandan Indians. The second group travelled up the Mississippi and Ohio Rivers to the Falls of the Ohio, where they established a well-defended colony; but wars with the Shawnee and Iroquois tribes eventually spelled their downfall.

Numerous accounts in the 16th through the 19th centuries recall meetings with fair-skinned Indians. Those accounts especially include encounters with the Mandans, but they also include accounts with a mysterious people known as the "Asguaw," "Tallega," and several other names. Memoirs and correspondence tell of encounters with "Welsh-speaking Indians" - and suggest how later arrivals may have dealt with the inconvenient possibility that other White settlers had preceded them.

Bibliography, Index


Introduction
...Coins have been found in New England that were designated as payment to Greek and Iberian soldiers in the army of Carthage. Other coins, which were found on a beach in Massachusetts, depict fourth century B.C. Roman Emperors. Similar coins have been unearthed all across New England.p align="justify">It is postulated...
...Coins have been found in New England that were designated as payment to Greek and Iberian soldiers in the army of Carthage. Other coins, which were found on a beach in Massachusetts, depict fourth century B.C. Roman Emperors. Similar coins have been unearthed all across New England.p align="justify">It is postulated that, for a long period of time, New England harbored a colony of Keltic and Phoenician settlers, the first of whom were Iberian with later arrivals of British and Irish origin. Phoenician sailors maintained an active trade with this colony for a time.

Some tribes of Algonquian Indians in the northeast have displayed Mediterranean Caucasoid physical characteristics. When Samuel de Champlain met with the Micmac tribe in 1609, he found them taking notes as he spoke to them. When examined, the notes were written in the hieroglyphics of Egypt and Libya and could be easily translated.

Many Algonquian words are phonetically the same as or similar to the same words in Gaelic including the words for fish stream, deep water, white stone, cold pond and many others.

What happened to these people? Were they destroyed in wars with the Algonquians? Were they decimated by a natural disaster or epidemic, or were they assimilated into the Algonquian tribes and Culture? No one knows. We know only that the evidence that they existed is compelling.


More . . .
1929: French Claim Discovery

Claims that French fishermen discovered American a century before Columbus landed in the West Indies were made in New York April 29, 1929 by Meade Minnigerode, author of "Certain Rich Men" and other historical books containing original research material, who returned from France after several months of delving into old documents. "In the course of research," Mr. Minnigerode said, "I encountered indubitable...

1929: French Claim Discovery

Claims that French fishermen discovered American a century before Columbus landed in the West Indies were made in New York April 29, 1929 by Meade Minnigerode, author of "Certain Rich Men" and other historical books containing original research material, who returned from France after several months of delving into old documents. "In the course of research," Mr. Minnigerode said, "I encountered indubitable evidence that French fishermen hunted whale and netted cod off Newfoundland as early as 1392, just a century before Columbus discovered America. The French may have been earlier even than that, but as far as documentary evidence is concerned they were on the fringe of the United States before the end of the 14th century." The author explaining that he found his records in the church tax lists of a little village on the coast of Brittany, which revealed further that there was great rivalry over the possession of the new fishing ground. The Bretons apparently successfully kept their secret, but the records showed that the fish wherewith the money was obtained to pay taxes, were caught off Newfoundland. He said that there was no doubt in his mind that the venturesome fishermen went sufficiently farther to reach the continent, and added that he felt sure documents to attest this would someday be found in records such as he examined.

-- International Herald Tribune, April 29, 2004



Pages 280
Year: 2004
LC Classification: E109.W4T73
Dewey code: 970'.0049166ódc22
BISAC: HIS028000
BISAC: HIS029000
Soft Cover
ISBN: 978-0-87586-299-6
Price: USD 23.95
Hard Cover
ISBN: 978-0-87586-300-9
Price: USD 29.95
Ebook
ISBN: 978-0-87586-301-6
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