For a Kinder, Gentler Society
Nation Building
Or Democracy by Other Means
  • Hamid Karimianpour
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Nation Building. Or Democracy by Other Means
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Despotism, fundamentalism, and the rise of terrorism have created a puzzling moral question in the twenty-first century: how far should America go to help press ahead political and cultural change in the world?  explores five major historical transformations over the past two centuries and demonstrates the significance of internal leadership for social, political, and cultural change.

The reader will discover that "while international pressure has often played a pivotal role in encouraging change," peaceful democratizations are historically not imposed from outside but are initiated and executed by leaders within the old system.


About the Author

Hamid Karimianpour is a political activist and author with an interest in current affairs and international politics.

Karimianpour was born in Iran, where he experienced major political and cultural transformations firsthand following the 1979 Islamic revolution. While still a teenager, he immigrated to Europe. He studied philosophy and economics at the University of Oslo in Norway and did postgraduate studies in philosophy at the University of Hull in the UK .

Now an academic residing in Virginia, he has written and edited numerous articles on political and philosophical themes.

About the Book
Despotism, fundamentalism, and the rise of terrorism have created a puzzling moral question in the twenty-first century: how far should America go to help press ahead political and cultural change in the world?

Many Americans believe...
Despotism, fundamentalism, and the rise of terrorism have created a puzzling moral question in the twenty-first century: how far should America go to help press ahead political and cultural change in the world?

Many Americans believe that we have a moral duty to help change the world for the better, but our well-intended efforts are often viewed by people in other parts of the world as meddling in their internal affairs. What, then, is right? Nation Building or Democracy by Other Means explores five major historical transformations over the past two centuries and demonstrates the significance of internal leadership for social, political, and cultural change.

The reader will discover that while international pressure has often played a pivotal role in encouraging change peaceful democratizations are historically not imposed from outside but are initiated and executed by leaders within the old system.

The book examines in a fresh light some of the watershed social changes that have shaped America as we know it, as well as failed and successful regime changes around the world.

Examples considered range from the US Abolition Movement, and the struggle for gender equality, to the fight against Apartheid, to Gorbachev’s move toward democracy in the former Soviet Union, with a special focus on Iran, including the 1953 US-led coup and the 1979 hostage crisis, and an analysis of the failures and accomplishments of Ahmadinejad, who has few cards to play in the poker game of international power politics.

This book, written in easy and thought-provoking language, makes a valuable contribution to the discussion about America's obligations and limitations for changing the world.
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Pages 252
Year: 2011
LC Classification: JC423.K284 2011
Dewey code: 321.8--dc22
BISAC: POL007000 POLITICAL SCIENCE / Political Ideologies / Democracy
Soft Cover
ISBN: 978-0-87586-843-1
Price: USD 23.95
Hard Cover
ISBN: 978-0-87586-844-8
Price: USD 33.95
eBook
ISBN: 978-0-87586-845-5
Price: USD 23.95
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