For a Kinder, Gentler Society
Restorative Justice
Prison as Hell or a Chance for Redemption
  • Jennifer Furio
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Restorative Justice. Prison as Hell or a Chance for Redemption
Sound Bite

Through cover art by prison inmate VV Culver, Jennifer Furio defines a prisoner as someone held against their will, whether in nursing homes, rest homes, mental institutions, jails, prisons or concentration camps, for reasons ranging from old age, unconventional thinking or poverty, to religious beliefs, sexual preference or political belief, and they note that only approximately ten percent of prisoners are violent.

Together, they ask: Children, where are your parents? Parents, where are your politics? Society, where is your humanity?

Without evidence to show that increased incarceration rates provide any safer communities, the ultimate question is whether this system serves the interests of American society.

About the Author

Author and prison-reform activist Jennifer Furio is a frequent guest on national talk shows including Montel Williams, 20/20, and Dateline. She has three books with Algora.

About the Book
Part an explication of the idea of restorative justice and part the traumatic personal story of a young woman unfortunate enough to fall into the claws of the current US penal system, the book demonstrates through both logic and emotion that we,...
Part an explication of the idea of restorative justice and part the traumatic personal story of a young woman unfortunate enough to fall into the claws of the current US penal system, the book demonstrates through both logic and emotion that we, as the sophisticated, modern, and moral society we claim to be, can do better and must do better in dealing with members of society who are failing.
Introduction
It’s time to get tough on crime! How often do we hear that refrain from our political leaders? A colleague of mine had an interesting way of challenging this view. “If we choose to live by an ‘eye for an eye’ and a ‘tooth for a tooth’ philosophy, we’ll soon have a whole bunch of one-eyed toothless people walking around!” he said.Although...
It’s time to get tough on crime! How often do we hear that refrain from our political leaders? A colleague of mine had an interesting way of challenging this view. “If we choose to live by an ‘eye for an eye’ and a ‘tooth for a tooth’ philosophy, we’ll soon have a whole bunch of one-eyed toothless people walking around!” he said.Although this is an overstatement to many, a person need not look far to see many graphics effects of the way we “do” justice. The United States now imprisons more adults than any other industrialized country. Driven by a view that punishing offenders will deter crime and make communities safer, governments and justice officials continue to support expansion of one key industry — prisons — sending more and more men and women to jail, and for longer periods. Yet, despite the lack of any credible evidence to show that this punitive view of justice is providing safer communities and reducing crime, our justice system marches on, based on an assumption that we simply need more and more of the punishing same.

But how is this justice system serving us? Are jails rehabilitating and healing offenders? Are victims being heard, compensated and helped? Do local community members feel any sense of involvement and empowerment in the…



Pages 208
Year: 2002
LC Classification: HV8688 .F87
Dewey code: 364.6/8 21
BISAC: POL000000
BISAC: SOC030000
Soft Cover
ISBN: 978-1-892941-74-9
Price: USD 19.95
Hard Cover
ISBN: 978-1-892941-75-6
Price: USD 26.95
Ebook
ISBN: 978-0-87586-176-0
Price: USD 26.95
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